Showing posts with label Sports. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sports. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Erin Andrews Deserves Every Penny




I have to admit, I'm shocked that this wasn't settled out of court years ago in favor of Erin Andrews:

Erin Andrews' $75 million stalking lawsuit goes to court
Court proceedings are getting underway in a $75 million lawsuit filed by sports reporter Erin Andrews against a peeping Tom who recorded her naked, as well as the hotel she blames for allowing it to happen. NBC's Janet Shamlian reports from Nashville.

It was a Marriott Hotel, and I cannot for the life of me figure out why they didn't make this go away when they had the chance. What benefit is there for the Marriott chain to be dragged through the mud like this? Whoever was working at the front desk on the day in question opened up the entire company to a massive lawsuit that was going to be filed and pursued through the courts no matter what.

Here's the gist of what happened--Erin Andrews checks into the hotel. A man calls up and uses basic social engineering to get the front desk to assign him the room next to her without notifying Andrews or her employer at the time, ESPN. He checks in to the room next to her and uses that proximity to film her through the peep hole. This same asshole puts the video on the Internet, gets caught, and spends time in jail.

As in, he was criminally convicted of invading her privacy.

The company in question now faces this lawsuit. And they're fighting it? Really?

Give Andrews every penny. Every single penny. What a disgrace--to make the business decision to fight her in court and thereby hope to save some money by gaming the jury system. Their strategy has to be to get the award knocked down some how by trying to prove that this did not hurt her career. Well, to hell with the career--it violated her privacy and safety. Isn't that enough? Apparently not.


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Monday, February 16, 2015

Time to Get the Blood Out of the Stone


Do you really think Lance Armstrong is going to pay back the money?
A Texas arbitration panel gave a $10 million judgment for SCA Promotions in its suit against disgraced American cyclist Lance Armstrong for bonuses it paid for his Tour de France championships.
"We are very pleased with this result," SCA president and founder Bob Hamman said in a statement, per Brent Schrotenboer of USA Today. "It is hard to describe how much harm Lance Armstrong's web of lies caused SCA but this is a good first start towards repairing that damage."

The arbitration panel, which voted 2-1 in SCA's favor, will now turn its ruling over to a judge, who must give a final approval. SCA asked the panel to do so out of fear Armstrong would refuse to pay it the $10 million.
Armstrong can default on these judgments and no one would care. How bad can the public image of a man stripped of seven Tour de France victories get before people notice he's a sleaze?

Money is easy to hide. He can divest himself of property and fortune and tell the government to go pound sand. Token payments and tales of hard luck go a long way. He can live out his life free from accountability, albeit with limited potential to earn money and absolutely no dignity whatsoever.

I'm thinking he doesn't care. This is America. A wealthy man can do whatever he wants and reinvent himself when public furor subsides. Armstrong is little more than an afterthought now.

Monday, February 2, 2015

Warren Sapp Has a Working Girl Problem

A good lawyer can make this go away because these kinds of arrests are entrapment situations that usually come down to misunderstandings and a genuine concern for helping a young lady make her school tuition payments on time. You Better Call Saul, my man.

In the case of Warren Sapp, does he have the money to hire a good lawyer? How many times has he filed bankruptcy? Can he afford a criminal defense attorney based on the conditions of his existing bankruptcy?

If this was Las Vegas, he'd be fine. Hence, a great argument for holding every Super Bowl in sin city. I don't know why we persist in maintaining the illusion that the gamblers don't exist. Pander and cater to the gamblers, and grow the hell up.

Monday, December 29, 2014

No, Video Games Should Not Be in the Olympics




Nope.

And the argument that starts off with "curling" or anything related to synchronized swimming is just more of the same kind of trolling that won't get you anywhere, son.

Thursday, November 20, 2014

This is How You End up Broke




Jack Johnson of the Columbus Blue Jackets let his parents "manage" his affairs. Here's what they did to him:

Miller was the first lender, extending a $1.56 million loan on March 9, 2011, that Johnson’s parents used to buy the home in Manhattan Beach, a third of a mile from their son’s residence, while he played for the Kings.


Johnson, a source said, believed that his parents took out a mortgage using money left to them in the will of a relative who had recently died.


The loan — which carried a 12 percent interest rate, almost three times the market rate — quickly went into default because it called for an initial payment of more than $1 million. (The contract extension Johnson signed with the Kings didn’t kick in until the following season, and he didn’t have that much in the bank.)


One day after the home loan was signed, on March 10, 2011, the Johnsons borrowed $2 million at an interest rate of 12 percent from a software developer in Iowa named Rodney L. Blum, who this month won a seat in the U.S. House.


Blum’s office did not respond to interview requests left with Blum’s spokesman by The Dispatch. It’s unclear how Johnson’s family came to know him or why he was making a personal loan at a high interest rate.


Barely a month later, on April 14, 2011, the Johnsons borrowed $3 million — at 24 percent — from Pro Player Funding in upstate New York, a company that “monetized” several NFL players’ contracts during a work stoppage. Former NFL stars Vince Young, who went bankrupt, and Bryant McKinnie, who was sued for default, were among the company’s clients.


Johnson was sued by both Blum and Pro Player Funding within a month of the loans being signed. He signed settlements, according to court documents, without appearing in court to contest the lawsuits.


To settle Blum’s suit, Johnson had $41,800 — or 25 percent — garnisheed from his bimonthly Blue Jackets paychecks over much of the past two seasons.


The next two years brought additional loans and additional defaults, sources said, but the next loan that ended up in the court system was extended on Sept. 13, 2013: a $400,000 loan at 18 percent from EOT Advisors in Tarrant County, Texas.


They essentially used Johnson's future earnings as collateral and "monetized" his contract, which has bankrupted him. When you're borrowing money at an interest rate of 24%, you've essentially entered a financial zone reserved for Rent-a-Center customers and payday lenders. They could have each taken a million dollars and that would have left Johnson solvent and in great shape. Instead, they used a series of loan schemes to take everything this kid had, and then some.





In other words, a professional hockey player who signed a contract worth $30 million dollars in 2011 has about $50 grand in the bank, if that.





Johnson has severed himself from his family, by the way, and has no idea if his 16 year-old brother is being taken care of by his parents. Now that the gravy train has stopped, hopefully they've been able to get jobs and start paying back their son.





Yeah, right.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

The Running Man




I have seen Keith Boissiere running through southern Baltimore. He runs through some sketchy areas, it would appear, and he is not going to give up, no matter what. I haven't seen him in a decade, if that. Wow.